ArtsCan Circle
  • 585 Dundas Street East (3rd floor) Toronto, Ontario M5A 2B7
  • 905 836-9117

The Female force is strong in Fort Albany

ArtsCan Circle is very proud to have strong female representation on our trip to Fort Albany this way. Read about our female artists here…
Gloria Hope is an Indigenous visual artist, sculptor, mural painter, author/illustrator and facilitator of art and nature. She graduated from Seneca College Visual Arts program, but considers herself to be primarily a self-taught artist inheriting her creative gift from her ancestral roots. Other passions involve alternative building and sustainable living.
Gloria’s focus is centered on connecting children to the natural world. She merges the elements of nature, art, story telling and visualization to stir the imagination. She believes that some of our children of today suffer from Nature Deficient Disorder NDD, a disconnection to the natural world and disconnection to self. She feels strongly that merging these elements will help in fostering individual healing, personal growth, positive self-image, respect for the environment and reverence for all living things.
“I have walked the way of the natural world all my life, running barefoot with the wind throughout our one hundred and fifty hector farm gathering rocks, feathers, and wood that spoke to me along the way. Since a young child I have known, felt and lived a deep magical connections to the Earth with a natural intuitive communication and profound reverence for all living things. I have always created with the vision, tools and materials of the Earth, nature is my inspiration the natural world my life, my studio and canvas.” – Gloria Hope
Juulie Rousseau is a visual artist and musician, she teaches children’s music and knows how to play the guitar, piano, has killer vocals, well versed at song composition and will also lead visual art classes. Born in Quebec, Canada, from an early age, Juulie displayed great interest in music and began composing elaborate instrumental pieces. After attending numerous music schools, Juulie studied classical guitar in college and singing (jazz voice performance)  at Laval University.
In 2010, she released her debut album Comme le monde, comprised entirely of original material. As a songwriter, she currently nurtures her craft by creating music that, not unlike her, travels all around the Earth. In 2014, Juulie launched her second album Landscape, influenced by the Mongolian steppe and her journeys in Québec’s first nations lands. She is also the singer and founder of the Canadian-Mongolian  ensemble SHUVU. We are thrilled to have her on board as she has experience working with Innu children in Unamen Shipu and children in Mongolia. Juulie is currently working on her third album, Come Again, which translates her remarkable experiences in Iran into music. She shares her passion for teaching music to children in Montreal and in remote communities with ArtsCan and Fort Albany youth.
 

Amanda Hurst